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DHOLE Cuon primaevus

"Dhole" comes from the Anglo/Indian word "tola," which means "wolf." "Dog" comes from the Old English word "daga," for the animal. he Dhole, Red Dog or Asiatic Wild Dog is a fairly large (10 - 20 kg) pack-living canid found in thick scrub jungles and dense forests up to 3000 m throughout mainland southeast Asia from India to eastern China, and on the islands of Java and Sumatra.

About Wild Dogs
Name DHOLE Cuon primaevus in Bhutan
Habitat Eastern Asia from India to China, and as far south as Java (Indonesia). They typically live in the forested areas in their range.
Diet Its main prey is large mammals (deer, wild sheep, goats, spotted deer, sambar deer, wild sheep, small deer, rodents, rabbits and even water buffalo).
They hunt the larger animals in a pack unit. Dholes can kill animals up to ten times their own size, and often drives its prey into the water. They tend to avoid humans.
Physical
Appearance
The coat is a distinctive rust color on the back, and paler underneath. The tail usually has a black tip. The female has 16 nipples. This species has 40 teeth. The head and body are 35 to 45 inches long with the tail adding 16 to 20 inches. They weigh 30 to 46 pounds. Their ears are rounded and large, and are filled with white hair. The dhole's hair is longer and lighter-colored in the northern parts of their range, and darker and shorter in the southern parts of their range. They have a short square muzzle that enables them to have a very powerful bite.
Social
Behavior
Dholes live in packs of 5-12 individuals, with some packs exceeding 25 members, with most members being related in some way. In many packs that have been studied, there were twice as many males as females in the pack. Fighting is not common as there is a strict hierarchy. The females are very social and have been known to share their dens with other breeding females. All members of the pack care for the cubs and carry them food back from a hunt. The pups will not leave the denning area until they are 10 weeks old. During this time, they will fight to establish a dominance order, even at that young age. Dholes are mature at one year, and they may or may not leave the pack.
Dhole keep a large territory, from 40-84 sq km. They are primarily diurnal and crepuscular, but are occasional active at night.

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